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Chapter 7 Bankruptcy Car Loans

More now than ever before, many people are searching for chapter 7 bankruptcy car loans. With today’s economy, people find themselves filing chapter 7 bankruptcies to relieve themselves of too much debt.

When someone files for a chapter 7 bankruptcy they are filing with the court system asking that they be discharged from all unsecured debt. Unsecured debt includes such things as medical bills or credit cards.

Compare this to secured debts such as your home and your vehicle. Due to homestead protection laws your home is safe from your creditors acquiring it. With a chapter 7 bankruptcy, your car loan may need special consideration.

In some cases, people are finding that they must release their vehicle along with the discharge of other debts. This may be caused by a couple different situations. One reason may be that they have simply fallen too far on the payments. Or another reason may be because the monthly payment is simply too high to make and stay current with the new finances.

If this is the case for you, you may be in the market for chapter 7 bankruptcy car loans. These are considered sub-prime auto loans and you may be able to apply a few months after your discharge has occurred. Depending on some situations you may not have to wait this out and can apply as soon as you are discharged.

Because not all lenders work with those who have recently filed chapter 7 bankruptcies, it will require a little research to find a dealership that may offer you this specialty loan. Doing an internet search will help you locate a couple of resources near your home.

The next thing to do would be to take a good hard look at your new monthly budget and determine realistically what type of payment you can handle each month. Being prepared with this figure can help ensure you are not smooth talked by some salesman to buy a more expensive car. The biggest key after bankruptcy is to be sure that you live within your means and can make all your new payments on time.

Now collect a few pieces of documentation to bring with you when you visit a car dealer or auto consultant that offers chapter 7 bankruptcy loans. This would include a couple recent check stubs to show proof of your income. Also bring your driver’s license and proof of insurance. And the final thing to bring with would be a couple utility bills. This will serve as proof of residency.

You are now prepared to pay a visit to the dealership or the auto consultants office. Tell the salesperson your situation and the particular reasons that you had to file the bankruptcy in the first place. Ask them if there is anything else you can provide to help make the loan process a little better. Use the advice of the expert to give you the greatest chance at getting a chapter 7 bankruptcy auto loan.

Buying Cars – What, Where And How Of Availing Auto Loans

Many individuals send e-mails and mailers to inquire about the best way of buying a car through car buying services. The questions also include other issues such as how to find proper auto insurance, how to avail car loans, and how to avail best car loan rates. Some individuals desire to buy a cheap car to drive around and later sell it, while others want to buy a brand new car and keep it on permanent basis. We hope you find it useful.

Places to buy a car:-

New cars are generally sold by factory-authorized dealers that specialize in certain brands of cars through car finance facilities. In certain cities, big car marts offer a wide range of selection in terms of different brands of cars under a single roof, and these places offer good car finance loans. Some internet companies boast in offering the best possible price for your new car through their car loan programs. All new cars will have a summary note attached with the vehicle listing all the features and options offered by the particular model. It’s important to note that the price is usually negotiable, and that majority of the buyers always pay a lesser amount than the window sticker price. Used cars are also available from new car dealers, and from independent used car lots as well as private individuals. These places provide attractive car loan rates. Used car lots offer older vehicles at attractive prices with a limited warranty attached to the price tag.

How to find your car?

Newspapers always display advertisements for new as well as used cars offered for sale by the dealers, used car lots, and individuals wanting to dispose off their existing vehicles. The Sunday edition generally advertises the biggest selection. Many internet sites also list cars and their models for sale in various parts of the USA. In addition, car magazines present attractive adverts for used auto finance having low car loan interest rates.

Buying your car:-

The registration laws of motor vehicles keep on varying from state to state. However, most states require the owner of a motor vehicle to possess a car title or certificate stating the ownership registration with the state motor vehicle bureau. While buying your car, the seller needs to produce the car ownership papers. Generally, the buyer as well as the seller has to appear before a motor vehicle registration representative to make the sale official by signing the related papers. The state transport bureau later records the information. At the time of buying the car, whether through car loans or auto loans, the buyer is required to pay a registration fee and any sales tax for the purchase. The registration officials are available at all automobile club offices. It is not advisable to buy a car when someone offers to sell it without proper papers. Chances are you could be purchasing a stolen car.

Car Dealer Leasing Tricks

Too often when it comes to auto-leasing, people get so dazzled by the myriad terms and the jargon thrown their way that they end-up paying through the nose, relying on a dealer’s “help” than their own informed decision.

Here is a look at some of the tricks dealers use to pad their profits and leave the customers shelling hundreds of dollars more than the deal should be worth.

Trick 1: Leasing always a better deal than buying

Dealers use the lure of lower-monthly payments to entice customers to sign for long-term loans, with terms stretching for five years or more, making the payments even lower. There are two catches with such lengthy contracts: higher mileage, exceeding the prescribed limit, and hefty repair costs.

With leases charging on average 10 to 20 cents a mile for any extra mile over the agreed amount in the contract, and warranties only covering three years, you leave yourself wide open for hefty charges for excessive mileage and wear and tear.

Trick 2: Cheap 2-3% APR rate on your lease

The dealer is not quoting the interest rate you would be paying on your lease; he’s rather giving you the lease money factor. Whilst similar to an interest rate and important in determining your monthly payment, a more accurate rate is calculated by multiplying the money factor by 24. For example a “cheap” 3% money factor is 24 X 0.003 = 7.2%. This gives you a better sense of what your annual interest rate on your lease contract is.

Trick 3: Stress-free early lease termination

Dealers know consumer driving needs change and they would like to have the option of getting out of a lease commitment sometime down the road, before their lease ends. Truth of the matter is, when you sign for a lease, you are effectively saddled with monthly payments for the remainder of the lease term and there is little-choice of getting out early. Lease contracts carry hefty financial penalties for either defaulting on monthly payments or terminating the lease earlier than the scheduled term.

To avoid being on the receiving end of such tried-and-true tricks, educate yourself about leasing. Get down to the nitty-gritty and understand what the leasing terms used by dealers mean. Crunch the numbers along with him and understand how they arrived at the monthly payment figure. Don’t sign anything until you’ve understood all the terms and your numbers much those of the dealer. Do not let the dealer pressure you into signing; you are the one to determine whether the agreement is right for you.